Saturday, March 31, 2012

monocles and bars of gold

Pictured above is my new monocle, ordered from eBay.  Unlike the traditional images of monocles we've all seen (pictured below), this monocle cannot possible fit to be worn in the eye, even for a few seconds.

image source: Boston
What it can do, however, is magnify the text of a book, which would have come in handy had I had it three weeks ago when I was working major overtime for my part time job and had trouble seeing the small text on some pages after several hours of typing information into a database.  And, because said monocle is actually attached to a long gold chain that can be worn around the neck.

I wonder if it can start fires as well...

On another note, I also had the pleasure of watching a Victorian caper film, The Great Train Robbery (1978), this evening.  Starring Sean Connery, Donald Sutherland, and Leslie-Anne Down, it depicts the execution of a train robbery involving a shipment of gold meant for the troops in the Crimean War by mastermind criminal Pierce (Connery).  Besides hearing Sean Connery's sexy voice throughout a great deal of the movie, it's also a greatly entertaining flick.  Besides that, it also depicts a few  interesting things which existed in Victorian times- such as a bell for coffins to indicate that someone was buried alive- as well as a few which I am not sure did- such as a doorbell for a carriage driver to ring from his carriage.

image source: Rail Serve
Regardless of what may or may not be historically correct, go see the movie anyway, especially if you like caper films.  It will be worth it.

2 comments:

  1. Why have I never seen that movie? What is wrong with me?!? I just added it to my Netflix queue. :)

    A monocle on a chain is a great idea! How is the fire-starting going? ;)

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  2. You'll love the movie!

    As for the fire-starting, I'm waiting to test it out when I go back to suburbia. trying it in my tenement square living conditions is probably not the best of ideas. (*evil grin*)

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